Improve your employee retention with stay interviews

Annual employee engagement surveys are a common activity these days. More and more companies are also conducting pulse surveys, asking only a few questions on a more frequent basis. While these are for your entire employee population, a stay interview can be very personalised. A stay interview can give your organisation additional insights and identify specific actions to retain key talent.

What are stay interviews?

Most organisations conduct exit interviews. The leaver is asked about the reasons for their decision to move on. A standard question is what would have made you stay. As exit interviews generally take place on the leaver’s last working day or even after they’ve left, it’s too late. The employee is gone.

With stay interviews, you have an opportunity to find out where an employee stands right now. It’s an opportunity for an organisation to learn more about the individual’s needs and explore how to retain them. Stay interviews also discover areas which make the employee want to resign.

When to conduct a stay interview?

Stay interviews can be conducted at any time of the year. They can be informal chats or formal meetings. Ideally, the stay interview is a face-to-face meeting to underline the importance the company places on it. A stay interview could take as little as 15 minutes or could be a longer conversation.

Who should be involved?

The direct supervisor should meet with the employee as it also aims to create and deepen trust and open communication between the two.

The line manager needs to be willing to hearing the employee’s feedback. Active listening is key to successful stay interviews. Line managers may need to receive a (refresher) training. Line managers will need to be mindful that, while they may disagree with the answers, they are hearing the employee’s current reality.

Stay interviews aren’t performance discussions where the line managers provides the employee with suggestions to enhance their performance. It is therefore all about the individual, their desire to stay and grow with the company.

Should the line manager and the employee have a rocky relationship, HR may support such stay interviews. Alternatively, external survey providers may provide an additional level of safety and create extra room for honest answers.

What are some sample questions?

Stay interview questions should be easy to answer questions with tougher ones to discuss as the meeting progresses. They should also express your commitment to the individual.

Stay interview questions include:

  • Do you look forward to coming to work when you brush your teeth in the morning?
  • What do you like most about your work and the company?
  • What do you like least about your work and the company?
  • How happy are you working here on a scale of 1-10 with 10 representing the happiest?
  • How would your day working here look like if it were a 10?
  • Do you feel that you are part of a bigger vision and mission? Why or why not?
  • Do you believe that your work has meaning? How can we work together to make your work more meaningful?
  • Do you feel “fully utilised” in your current role? If not, what could we change?
  • Are there additional things that we can do to take more advantage of your talents and interests?
  • Is the company providing you with opportunities to grow and develop as a person and as a professional?
  • What would you like to learn here?
  • What can I as your line manager do differently to support you the best? What can I do more/less of?
  • Are you treated respectfully by your co-workers?
  • What type of feedback would you like to receive about your performance? From me as your line manager? From co-workers?
  • How would you like to be recognised?
  • Have you ever thought about leaving the company? If so, what might tempt you to leave?
  • Is there anything else you want to share that we did not cover?

What happens after the stay interview?

Most stay interviews are documented. Best practices recommends going further. HR should collate and analyse the input before sharing the results with managers. Together, the organisation can identify which feedback to implement and how, looking for quick wins and possibly phased approaches, as part of their retention strategy. As such, it’s of vital essence that the organisation is willing to take actions after conducting the stay interviews. If not, it may give the employee just another reason to leave.

Are you afraid of losing your key performer? Conduct a stay interview and uncover areas of concern. Uncertain how to link it to your overall HR strategy and initiatives? Contact us and find out how we can help you make low-cost changes making a big impact for your employees.

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